A glimps into the world of wildlife rehabilitation…the world through a rehabber's eyes.

Posts tagged “Cat

Ulyses Thanks You!


Thank you to all of our wonderful supporters who contributed to our critical needs baby! Your support was overwhelming, and wonderful!!! We have almost reached our funding goal for this little one! Of course, our goal will only cover part of his medical care, so any and all help is graciously welcome! Thank you to all of our amazing, wonderful, incredible readers and supporters for everything you do to help us return these wild babies back to their world! Ulyses may get to taste freedom yet, and it is all thanks to our unbelievably amazing supporters! You guys are the BEST supporters any non-profit could ever ask for! THANK YOU! You, and you alone make what we do here at WCCR possible!

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Our urgent care case: Ulyses


The Wildlife Center at Crosstimbers Ranch has received a very special guest that urgently needs your help. His name is Ulyses, and he is only ten weeks old. He has been separated from his mother and siblings, and the poor little guy has suffered some serious trauma in his short life.

Ulyses is a bobcat, and he already has a special place in the hearts of all of the staff members here at WCCR. You see, at this tender age, he has had a little altercation with a dog…that resulted in a compound fracture of his leg, and massive infection. This poor little wild one is terrified and alone, and he can’t even yet have a buddy to comfort him. For now, until his condition improves a bit, his stuffed animal is his closest companion.

The thought of this poor little guy terrified and hurting tugs at my heartstrings every time. Especially when all we can do is sit back, and support him on his journey 😦

Little Ulyses upon intake

Here at Crosstimbers, we do 90% of our medical treatment on site.

There are many reasons for this that I may go into in some future blog, but for right now, my main focus is to help this little one return to the wild. But in order to do that, I am going to have to solicit some help! To rehab a single (healthy) bobcat from kitten to release, costs more than $2,000 and over 12 months in feeding and maintenance alone. Any medical treatment or other operational care all comes at additional expense.

For Ulyses, the cost will probably be more than double that figure.

Our bestest heart bandages ❤

His tiny leg will be set in his heart emblazoned cast for at least the next six weeks, and he will need some heavy-duty antibiotics (as well as other medications) to battle the massive infection.

Supportive care will also include a special immune system supporting diet and eventually, physical therapy.

Little Ulyses had to be sedated for this procedure, so once his cast was secured, he was placed in isolation to recover from anaesthesia.

His ongoing care, rehabilitation, and physical therapy are going to be major hurdles for WCCR this year. The economy has put a squeeze on us all, and we are definitely feeling it. We are trying to raise $500 towards his ongoing care, and every cent helps.

If every person who read this blog donated just ten dollars, that total sum would mean a massive step towards going back to the wild for this amazing cat! Every bit helps! If you want to be a wildlife hero, click on that donate button on the right hand column! I know we can do this. Lets get Ulyses back to the wild, together!


Bobcat meets house cat <3


Hey guys, check out this way cool video of a bobcat meeting with a house cat through the sliding glass door ❤ Not the reaction most people have in their minds when they think of house pets and predators, but very typical behavior of this beautiful feline 🙂

http://www.cbsnews.com/video/watch/?id=7406326n


De-fleaing bobcats


Yesterday, we gave all of the bobcats flea treatments and vaccinations. They were not amused….Nothing like trying to frontline and stick five pissed off 15-30lb razor blades. Not to mention, it does not make for photogenic kitties….

The release program cats are always far easier to catch, vaccinate, and treat. Why, you ask? The long-term bobcats are completely used to being handled, and  aren’t easily bluffed. They know what we are up to, and they know exactly how to make it as hard as possible for us to do anything with them. It probably took ten minute per cat for the long terms, and closer to five for the release programs.

We vaccinated everyone except for Giggles (a release program bobcat that came in late last year. She got a special name because she has an odd habit of sticking her tongue out when she growls at you…it is rather adorable), and Olly. Giggles and Olly seem to be suffering from some sort of mild cold, and we do not want to stress their immune systems with a vaccine until they are over their illness. I should stop here and mention that when Giggles came in, she was far smaller, and appeared to be a female (the different sexes seem to have different facial structures, which WCCR is researching). However, recently, after moving her from isolation back into the release program pen, we realized that she did not have girl parts, but boy parts. However, she has been here, and called female for so long, that we all continue to refer to her as “she”.

Once Giggles and Olly are over their colds (that they are being treated for), we are looking at releasing Giggles, and Irving. Hopefully, I will be able to post some good video of the release 🙂

The reason we vaccinate is the high volumes of animals usually on the property. We get bobcats (and other species) from all over the region. They all come in for various reasons, and vaccinations are a good way to stay on top of disease prevention.

All of the staff members at WCCR are highly trained and have tons of experience working with bobcats. These cats may not be huge, but they are extremely powerful, and can inflict a lot of damage for someone not trained to work with them. If you have an issue with a bobcat, while WCCR does not trap bobcats, and prefers that they stay in their natural environment, we do handle cases of confined bobcats. Please feel free to contact us if you do have a bobcat that needs help. PLEASE DO NOT ATTEMPT TO HANDLE A BOBCAT ON YOUR OWN!

I am really suprised that we haven’t had any new bobcats come in for the past few weeks…by now we should have babies. I guess the late hard freeze has a lot to do with that. Baby season has been really slow this year so far. You can always contact me at kari@crosstimberswildlife.org if you need assistance with a bobcat.

I know you guys are acustomed to photos, so here is one of the bobkittes before they were all mad at us!


I love three day weekends


I didn’t go out to the ranch Sunday or Monday, but I made a point to go out there today. We recieved a donation of venison a couple of days ago, and incoroprated it into their diets today. I cut it into small pieces, and gave each cat a couple along with their scheduled diet of chicken. Our bobcats are on a scheduled diet plan to not only ensure they are getting the vitamins and minerals they need, but to provide them with variety from day to day.

Some of the cats LOVED the venison and wouldn’t touch the chicken. Others tried the venison, but went back to the chicken that they are more familiar with. It was very interesting to see some of the bobcats’ reactions to the “new” diet.

I for one like the venison. The venison seems to more readily accept the suplements that we add to their diet. We currently have two bobcats that are under treatment, and the venison even seems to hold the medication better than the beef or chicken. I guess it is spongier or something.

Anyway, that is really all I did today…I know, very productive, right? I guess we can’t all be superman everyday. I felt like such a slacker…at least the bobcats forgive me.

kari@crosstimberswildlife.org